Sale 75 – Scalecolour

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Last Christmas my wifey bought me the Scale 75 Colour Collection. The Colour Collection contains all the 63 ‘basic’ range colours that Scale 75 produce and it also comes with a large aluminum paint tray that can hold 70 bottles of paint. The paint colours are as follows:

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The images above where taken from PaintRack app (see here for further details), it’s also worth noting that the Inktensity, Viking Gold and the Alchemy paints, although are Scale75 paints, are not part of the Colour Collection set but I have them listed in the slides above as they’re part of my Scale75 paint collection.

So after nine months of using the paints I thought it was about time that I wrote up my experience . The ScaleColour range is listed as having a ‘super matte finish’ and I have to admit that the paint finish is matte to the point of being almost chalky. Now I don’t want you to think chalky is in anyway bad it’s just that the ScaleColour has a really soft pastel finish to it which makes it ideal for blending. This chalky pastel colour range is fantastic for the foundation paint collection but there have been times where I’ve needed a really vibrant colour and I’ve had to use either a Citadel or Vallejo paint. To tackle this I’ve picked up the Scale75 Inktensity range to see if this will add some vibrancy when needed. I also expect that Scale75 Fantasy  & Games Collection will fill this gap. If Scale75 start selling the fantasy paint separately then I’ll pick some up to test but at the moment I don’t want to sink £118 into more paints.

Another thing that caught me out when I first came to use the paints is that each paint has a seal that needs to be broken before you can start using them. I presume this is to keep the paints fresh whilst they sit on a shelf in shop or a warehouse but if you’re not expecting it you can waste a few minutes wondering why no paint is coming out of the bottle when you’re squeezing it.

I also found that all the paints need a shake before use, and I mean a really good shake. One thing that did surprise me about the paint was how thick it is which means you only need a small amount, mixed with thinner, to go along way. In terms of thinner I’d really recommend the Scale 75 thinner as it seems to thin the paint Sioux diluting the pigmentation of the paint.

I’ve used the paint with a brush and also ran it through a paint brush and the coverage is great in both instances. Below is a picture of some Tomb Kings and Emperor’s Children that I’ve painted using the paints, I’m not the best painter but you get the idea.

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In conclusion I really love these paints, they have a lovely soft, chalky, matte look to them. They provide good coverage but they do need to be thinned. They’re a quality product.

04 – Forever Autumn – Building a Base

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Basing models is something I tend to rush. For me it’s normally the last step in the process and comes after I’ve completed the model which means I’m thinking about the next model and not the one I need to finish. With this in mind I decided that for my Emperor’s Children I’d make the bases in conjunction with the models.

The next decision was what type of base would match my pre-heresy Emperor’s Children, industrial, lava, snow, swamp or grass? In the end I went for a tiled derelict temple. I looked at resin bases but decided against this as I enjoy having a little money in my wallet. This led me to start trawling YouTube for do-it yourself basing videos. After watching a lot of dross I came across this video and decided that the method of creating a tiled floor looked easy, effective and a hell of a lot cheaper than resin bases.

The first step was to mark up 1cm x 1xcm squares on an old Warhammer box. After spending what seemed like an eternity cutting up a warsphinx box I eventually had enough tiles to begin gluing them to the base. For the tactical marine bases I decided to keep things simple so the tiles were glued directly to the base. For the larger terminator bases I added the hero of basing material cork. The cork added a physical depth and also distinguished the more costly models.

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I then glued the tiles to the top of the cork in a fairly even tile pattern. Once the glue was dry I used a craft knife to trim the overhanging tiles. I then removed and lifted some of the tiles to add to the sense of age, decay and abandonment to the base. Once this was done I added some grit to the base area of the cork and random piles on the tiles to further add to the abandoned feel. The base was then primed black.

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The next decision was around the colour scheme for the tiles. Originally I was thinking of making a dark green and black harlequin pattern but decided against this I thought it would probably end up being too dark. I then started to think about the overall theme of my Emperor’s Children, they’re still a loyalist legion but standing on the cusp of their fall into chaos. This led to me becoming a little poetic and thinking of my Emperor’s Children as being in the autumnal season of their service to the Emperor. To reflect this I thought I’d go with autumnal colours on the tiles so a deep red and yellow. To further reflect this I wanted to add some autumnal flocking to the base.

I then started to paint the full base using Scale 75 Walnut. The cork area was then dry brush highlighted with Scale 75 Tenere Yellow. For the tiles I went with Scale 75 Deep Red lightly mixed with the walnut and Scale 75 Tenere Yellow mixed with walnut and painted in an alternate pattern. These colours looked the most autumnal to me. After this a light drybrush of Scale 75 Rainy Grey over the tiles to pick out the tile edges.

The last element was to add some autumnal colour flocking to give the impression of fallen leaves.

I think the base complements the model nicely, what are your thoughts?

 

02 – The First Foundation Paint

The first five of my Emperor’s Children have now been built, primed, undercoated and highlighted. So I have five very mean looking cataphractii terminators who are sporting a fine set of lighting claws each, the captain and the apothecary. I have to say they are all very cool models that look amazing.

I started by priming the models black and then pre-highlighting with a light grey using an airbrush.

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After this it was a matter of choosing the right purple to use as my layer and first foundation . In the end I went for Scale 75 Violet for the darker areas with Army Painters Alien Purple as the highlight but colours were applied using an airbrush. These two colours will hopefully give me a nice base to either bring lighter for the extreme highlights or darken for the shadows. Due to the details involved with this next stage I’ll abandon the airbrush and pick up the trusty brush. For the highlights I’m thinking GW Emperor’s Children Pink or P3 Carnal Pink but I’ll probably end blending the two. For the low lights I’m thinking that P3’s Beaten Purple will be a good choice.

So that’s everything I’ve done so far, what do you think?

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Painting Sigmar’s Mail

When I started my Stormcast Eternals I wanted them in armour that looked as realistic to plate mail armour my painting ability would allow me to achieve. I like my miniatures to look like they are wearing armour that would be functional in an actual battle; which I admit does seem a little strange when you consider that they are a fantasy army so in theory they could wear any armour they wanted, even armour made of gold.

After looking at a lot of suits of armour, on a recent visit to Leeds Royal Armouries, I noticed that the plate mail varied dramatically in steel shades between the raised and recessed areas as the picture below highlights.

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The raised areas tended to be highly polished but the further into the recesses you looked the darker and duller the metal got. I wanted to duplicate this look on my miniatures.

To try and replicate this authentic plate mail look I firstly primed my models in white, as I knew I’d be dulling down the colour later so didn’t want my base layer too dark.

I then painted the armour areas with a player of Vallejo Game Air Chain Mail.

After this I made a 50/50 mix of burnt umber oil paint and black oil paint. I then coated all the metallic areas with the oil paint, left it for around five minutes and then wiped the paint off with a clean cloth. This left the recesses darker and the raised areas lighter as it was easier to remove the oil paint off the raised areas. Once I’d removed all the excess oil paint I left the model to dry.

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Once the oil paint had dried I began adding a highlight of Vallejo Game Air Silver to all the raised areas. I made sure that I had minimal paint on the brush so that I could easily blend the highlighted areas into the dark areas. I kept adding highlights to the raised areas until I was happy with the look.

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And that was that. I’m happy with the result, to me it looks authentic enough and in my eyes makes the Stormcast Eternals look a little more menacing than when they are painted in the official gold color scheme.

Genesis of a Painting Daemon

Bilbo just knocked his last  bottle of Devlan Mud over

Bilbo just knocked his last bottle of Devlan Mud over

“It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, painting miniatures. You buy one model, and if you don’t keep your wallet closed, there’s no knowing what you might paint.”

Bilbo’s hobby advice.

I’ve exchanged tweets with a few of my twitter followers about the pictures of my miniatures which I post under the #warmongers, #MiniatureMonday and #WIPWednesday hashtags. Most of the people I’ve spoken too are involved with the hobby but some are people who follow me on twitter for different reasons (my charm, razor sharp wit, dashing good looks, magnetic personality, beer nonsense and general moaning to name but a few). I’ve noticed over the past few months that several of my non-hobby followers have spoken to me about my miniatures and have said that they’d thought about getting some models in the past but have never taken that next step.

I enjoy painting models, it helps me unwind and relax and it seems a shame that some people think “I wouldn’t mind to trying that” but then never get any further. I believe part of the issue is that there’s a hell of lot of things to get from a specialised shop. If you’re totally new to the hobby to it all it can be very daunting.

The aim of this blog, therefore, is to provide a starting place for people who are interested in painting miniatures but have no idea where to start. I’ll cover what basic things you need to get and hopefully the cheapest way to get your hands on the godies. I’ve been painting miniatures now for just over a year so hopefully all my initial problems will be fresh in my mind.

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The first stop…

The first step with painting miniatures is also the hardest and it involves going to a hobby shop. For most people this will be a Games Workshop store as they are in most major town centers. You can get almost everything here that you will need to start the hobby, models, paints brushes, tools and primer. It sounds like the most ideal place to start but it’s not the place I get the bulk of my supplies from. To get all the basics you require you to start painting you will need to invest a little cash and buying direct for Games Workshop is notoriously expensive. If you buy your equipment from an independent model shop you will be will save around 15-25% off Games Workshop price as well as having access to other manufactures models and paints.

I’m going to plug Elemental Games here, cheap, massive stock range, a quick and reliable service and you earn store credit with each purchase. They have a shop and an amazing website too. If you do buy from Elemental Games then use promo code STE978 on the payment screen and you’ll receive double store credit points and I’ll receive some too! Everyone’s a winner baby!

Also remember to read as many blogs and watch as many videos as you can on painting – not rude videos as you’ll go blind. The information in blogs and videos is free, you’ll pick up so many new techniques by just reading and watching this stuff, so make sure you do it.

I’ll list the Games Workshop price (GW) and the Elemental Games prices (EG) below.

The first step…

So you’ve now decided where you’re going to buy your gear from, the next step is which models are you going to buy. I paint Blood Angel and Orks, both from the Warhammer 40k range, but if you want to go either into fantasy or sci-fi have a look at the whole model range as one model may look fab whilst the rest are mediocre. Google the fluff and get a feeling for the whole army. Once you’ve decided what army you want to paint (and even play) then I’d recommend that you get some general infantry units as your first models. If you buy infantry units you’ll get a lot more models for your money meaning you’ll have more to practice on as you start to learn the basic painting techniques.

Space Marine Assault Squad – GW £20.50 / EG £17.42

If you have a little more money to invest, and you like the armies, then you can get one of the box sets for either the Warhammer Fantasy Island of Blood featuring High Elves and Skaven or the Warhammer 40k Dark Vengeance box featuring Chaos Space Marines and loyalist Dark Angels Space Marines. You get a hell of a lot of models in each box and a self-contained game which you can use to bully your friends into getting into the hobby with. They do provide good value for money. If you’re only interested in one of the armies then you can put the others on eBay.

Island of Blood – GW £61.50 / EG £52.28

Dark Vengeance – GW £65 / EG £55.25

Step two…

Tools! There are lots of different tools for all manner of different purposes but you can actually get away with only needing a few to start with. At this point I would highly recommend that you do not buy any of the Games Workshop tools as they are really expensive. The build quality and finish are great but this is an area you can save on.

The first essential tool you will need are clippers to remove the model from the plastic spruce.

Clippers – GW£18 / EG £6.79

Next you’ll need a semi-circle file. One side is a semi-circle the other is flat. You’ll need a small plastic file to tidy your model by removing the mould line and smoothing over the areas where the model was attached to the spruce. Sadly, you can’t seem to buy individual files as they come in sets, you could, I suppose, use the spare files as bum scratchers.

Files – GW £12 / EG £4.49

Step 3…

Next you’ll want to glue your models together. Get them striking an epic pose and then use strong plastic glue.

Glue – GW £4.10 / EG £3.48

Step 4…

You’ll also need some primer. Once you’ve built your model you’ll want to prime it. If your model is going to be painted a dark colour scheme or mainly metallic then use a black primer. If your model is going to be of an overall lighter colour scheme, mainly flesh or light coloured robes then I’d use a white or grey primer. Primer allows the paint to stick and hold to the model. Bear in mind that you will only need a light coating over your model.

Primer – GW £9.80 / EG £8.33

Step 5…

You’ll need paints and there are lots to choose from. Paints are probably one of the cheapest things to buy but they can start getting expensive when you buy lots at once. I’d recommend searching the net for painting guides for the models you have chosen. Once you’ve read / watched a few you can buy the colours used to achieve the look you want.

Washes will soon become your best friend, they won’t let you down and they’re always there to make you look better than you actually are (which to be fair is better than what a real best friend does). Washes are a very easy way of adding shading to a model. They only contain a little pigment which allows you to see the painted area underneath but make the recesses of the model more shaded. The two washes I’d buy are Nulin Oil – a black wash that work great on metallic colours and Agrax Earthshade – a light brown shade that works well over fabrics.

GW – £2.40 a pot / EG – £1.99 a pot

Step 6…

Acrylic thinner, you need this, please purchase this. If you paint straight from the pot then your paint will be too thick and your model will look like it is melting. Paint that is too thick will destroy all the detail on the model and it’s probably the biggest pitfall for new painters. The acrylic thinner will thin your paint allowing for a thinner but smoother application of paint. It might take a little longer and a few coats to paint an area but the end results will be worth it. For each blob of paint on your pallet you’ll only need a small amount on thinner. You’ll want the paint to be the consistency of milk. The Emperor Demands thinned paint.

Paint for the Paint God!

Too Much Paint for the Paint God!

Acrylic thinner – GW Lahmian Medium £2.40 / EG £7.19

Step 7…

If you bought a paint set which included brushes then you’re set. If you didn’t then you’ll need a fine detail brush and a standard brush. To be honest you’d probably get away with just a fine detail brush (it’s the one I use 95% of the time).

Detail Brush – GW £3.75 / EG £2.98

Step 8…

All these things are free or you’ll have them in the house anyway, yippee!

  • An old mug to wash your brush in.
  • An old take-away tub lid to act as your palette.
  • Old newspaper to cover up the area where you’re painting. You will spill a paint pot and if you don’t have anything down to protect the table or carpet your significant other may hurt you as punishment and The Emperor won’t protect you.
  • Kitchen roll to dry your brush and remove excess paint.
  • Light for your painting area.
    • If you’re painting during the day then paint in front of a window. The natural light will help you see all the areas and stop you straining your eyes.
    • Painting in the evening (welcome to my world). Energy saving light bulbs are crap for painting under. Try and paint in the best lit room. You will also need to use a desk lamp to illuminate your work. If you take to the hobby then you need to invest in either daylight bulbs or a daylight lamp. It’s the kind that seamstresses use.

Things not to buy…

  • The White Dwarf monthly magazine. It’s expensive with no written content just nice pictures. Save the money and look for inspiring pictures on the internet.
  • Painting guides. Honestly, at a beginner level don’t bother. All the basic techniques and videos can be found on the net for free. There are some good guides I have bought but they have covered advanced techniques (airbrushing etc).
  • Too many models. If it’s not a limited edition then leave it in the shop. There’s nothing more disheartening than having a pile of models awaiting your attention as it puts pressure on you and then you’ll start to rush. If there’s only a limited run of the model then by all means get it and save it for the next project.

To get all the basics along with 10 tubs of paint  and a basic infantry model set you’re looking at splashing out £94.54 from Games Workshop and £70.50 from Elemental Games, a saving of £24.04.

The final and the most important thing you need for miniature painting is patience. Don’t rush the painting, take your time and enjoy the time you’re spending painting your model, you’re not thinking about work or life just the model. See your painting time as time to relax, have a beer or a glass of wine and listen to some music. It’s time wasted but in a constructive way.

If you do have a go at the hobby or you just want to ask a question then please add a comment.

Creating a Wet Palette

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The other day I decided to try my hand at creating a ‘wet palette’. Now for those of you who don’t know a wet palette is, it’s basically a magically simple tub that stops your paints from drying out once. It’s especially useful if you’ve created a unique colour and are halfway through a painting project as your paint will still be usable for days after the initial mixing.

Creating a wet palette is really simple and cheap so you don’t have an excuse for not using one.

Things you’ll need:

An air tight tupperware box that you can pick up from any supermarket or poundshop, please don’t use your child’s Transformers lunch box as it won’t be air tight and your child will crush your beloved plastic little men in a revenge attack.

A thick sponge that fits snuggly into the Tupperware box, it doesn’t have to be an exact fit but the closer to one the better.

Kitchen roll

Grease proof paper / baking paper

Water

Paint

First put the sponge in the Tupperware box. After that place a double layer of kitchen roll on top of the sponge and then pour the water –out of the tap- over the kitchen roll. Fill the tub about half way with water; a thick sponge is needed so that you can store more water which means there’s more water to keep your palette wet. The wet kitchen roll holds a layer of water at the top of the sponge which will keep your paint wetter, if you don’t use the kitchen roll the wonderful force that is gravity will pool all your water at the bottom of the sponge and the top of sponge – where your paint is – will get dry. After this cut a sheet of baking paper to fit the top of the Tupperware box and place it over the now wet kitchen roll and gently push it into place.

Congratulations, you’ve now made a wet palette. It was simple I know. Use the baking paper to mix your paint on (use paint thinner) and once you’ve finished put the lid on the Tupperware box to ensure it is air tight. An air tight box will keep your paint out of the pot fresh for days. If you want to prolong the life of the paint on the wet palette you can place the whole tub in the fridge but I won’t be responsible for any beatings you receive off your significant other!

 

Chaos Lord

Chaos Lord

One horny bastard

I’ve been working on my Chaos Lord for just over a month now, it’s in no way a difficult model to paint I’m just a really slow painter! I wanted the Chaos Lord to fit thematically with my Seekers of Slaanesh regiment but I didn’t want him to look exactly the same – he’s a Lord after all. I decided to stick with the purple and gold as the main colours but then mix and match everything else to add a little variety.

For the Warriors the purple came in with the capes and banner and the gold was the embossing on the shields. For the Chaos Lord I went for purple armour and flesh with gold embossing on the armour. I haven’t set the Warriors and the Lord out together yet but I’m sure that colour wise they’ll look as co-coordinated as superhero themed stag party.

So for those who would like to know how I painted my Chaos Lord then carry on reading.

I like to build up the major sections of the model first, paint them and then glue them together at the end. I paint for pleasure and am not concerned with how long a model takes to paint. I also thin all my paints before using them with the exception of the metallic colours as I can’t seem them to thin them down and keep their consistency.

After removing the model from the spruce and tidying the model up I primed it with Chaos Black GW spray paint. Is the spray paint still called that or is it Abaddon Black now?

I then painted the cape in Caliban Green* and washed it in Drakenhof Nightshade. Once the wash was dry I dry brushed the cape with a Caliban Green and Warpstone Glow mixture. I started off with just a hint of Warptone in the mix and thicker dry brushing to more Warpstone but just a hint of it on the brush. You will just want to be able to see it on your hand before applying it to the model.

*I’ll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
for the liquor is not earthly.

Once the cape was painted I moved onto the scabbard and coin purse which I painted Guilliam Blue and then dry brushed the edge lightly with a lighter blue.

For the spear blade I used Warplock Bronze and then glazed with Lamenters Yellow. After that I dry brushed the edges with Runefang Steel.

After this I started on the armour. The base was painted with Xerus Purple and then washed in Druchii Violet. Once dry I dry brushed with Daemonette Hide for the highlights. For the gold trim I used an undercoat of Screaming Bell, followed by Balthsar Gold and then highlighted with Golden Griffon. Surprisingly, there was no dry brushing taking place for the gold sections.

The bone areas were painted with an undercoat of Privateer Press Menoth White followed by Agrax Earthshade Wash and the dry brushed with Tyrant Skull*. I wanted to make the shoulder guard look like an actual skull instead of a forged part of the armour so I painted that in the same way. When I glued the front and back of the model together the joint wasn’t flush so I painted over the gap with liquid green stuff – which is potted magic – and then painted as normal.

*otherwise know as the mother-in-law

For the flesh I undercoated with Daemonette Hide, I then added some Cadian Fleshtone to the Daemonette Hide and painted the highlights.

Lastly the base was painted with a base of Mechanicus Standard Grey and they dry brushed (but using a normal brush) with Celestra Grey. As the base is compact and busy with a number of skulls and rocks I decided not to flock it.

And that was that, complete, done and dusted. My next project will be some Chaos Knights! Blood for the Blood God!

I got all my bits from Element Games (twitter: ), they’re around 15-20% cheaper than buying direct from Gamesworkshop. If you do order from Element Games then use code STE978 as you’ll get double store credit and I’ll get a little too!

Everyone’s a winner… except for the losers of course!