The Seekers of Slaanesh

The Seekers of Slaanesh
Last week I completed my first regiment of Chaos Warriors, the twelve warriors and their bases took me around two months to complete. For those of you who follow me on twitter you’ll have noticed that my feed has been saturated with pictures of Chaos Warriors slowly being assembled and built. For those who follow me for my wit, manly good looks and charm their fingers must have hovered over the unfollowbutton like a fat man’s finger lurks over the microwave start button.

When I was searching for inspiration for my colour scheme it became apparent that most people tended to paint their Chaos Warriors in

Would you like to blow my boney horn?

Would you like to blow my boney horn?

either a black, red or green colour scheme. I wanted something a little different and as purple is my favourite colour I decided to use that as the central colour to build my scheme around. To stick with the lore I decided to make them followers of Slaanesh as purple is also his colour. I also wanted the regiment to look clean. A lot of the pictures I’d seen made the warriors look dirty and Ill kept. I went for a clean look as the Warriors of Chaos are pure fighters, it’s all they do. If my life was dependant on, and focused around, deeds of arms then I’d make sure my equipment was clean and well maintained. I also imagined that any follower of Slannesh would be as vain as Narcissus and thus spend a lot of time on their personal appearance.
As I’d made the cape purple I decided to paint the fur area white and then wash it in Agrax Earthshade to add a little shade and depth. For the armour I wanted a blue metallic appearance. I created the colour by building up and mixing several different metal, blue colours and washes – I’ll give the details at the end. The colour would also make a good base colour for a Tzeentch themed army.

I chose gold for the armour and shield trim to maintain the clean look. I painted the shield and halberd in pure metallic colours and then washed them in a 50/50 purple wash and paint thinner mix.
For the bases I used some thin torn cork to add a little texture, painted then with the grey texture paint, added some rocks which I painted a lighter grey. I then dry brushed the cork with the lighter grey and then washed the whole base in either Agrax Earthshade or Nulin Oil. I then added a few clumps of grass, in many ways like Alan Titchmarsh.

Banner

I’ve dubbed the regiment “The Seekers of Slaanesh” (I painted a Slaanesh symbol on the banner and added a ‘N’ at the top like a compass, clever I know). I’m happy with the colour scheme and the way the bones and skulls have turned out, but there were still times when I struggled with the thickness of the paint and the painting of details with a thin brush – stopping the brush drying versus overloading it with paint. Overall, especially with this only being my second real project and my first every completed regiment, I’m happy with the end results.
My next model will be a Lord of Chaos that surprisingly has the same look on his face as I do when I’m having a poo.

If anyone has any tips or suggestions on where I can improve then please comment on the blog as all comments are greatly appreciated.

 

Cook Book

 

The Green Knight

Over the last few months I’ve been steadily honing my painting skills by watching youtube videos, reading forums and other hobbyists tweets and of course practicing. I’ve definitely noticed a big improvement when I compare my first first Rohan Warrior – which I painted back in November – and my biggest project to date – The Green Knight. Overall, I’ve found the whole process, from assembling to painting, a lot of fun but it has been a steep learning curve and I’ve made a lot of school boy errors along the way.

So in this blog I will cover how I made the Green Knight. This blog in no way is intended to be a definitive guide on “how to paint The Green Knight” as quite frankly I’m nowhere near the standard of painter that can lecture others on how to paint. I want this post to be a “how I bumbled my way through my first project” guide.

So why did I chose The Green Knight as my first project? I suppose the biggest reason is that I love knights, medieval knights, fantasy novels, RPGs, magic wizards and swords. I also really love the Arthurian tale of “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight”. So when I first saw the Green Knight miniature I knew it was the miniature for me, In short he looked epic.

There was however, three things that niggled my about the miniature which I knew I had to change. The first was that he was carrying a sword. The Green Knight does not carry a sword he carries “the mother of all axes“. This meant that I would have to carry out my first conversion if I wanted the Green Knight to look as I wanted him to. The second issue was the standard that attaches itself to the Green Knights back. I hated it, it just seemed a little too oriental for how I envisaged my knight, it had to go. Finally, the third issue was the armour and horse colour, everything had to be green as that’s how the Green Knight is described in the tale and not how Games Workshop had painted him in their promotional material.

“No soul had ever seen

a knight of such a kind –

entirely emerald green.

[…]

and in the other hand held the

mother of all axes,

a cruel piece of kit I kid you not:

the head was an ell in length at least

and forged in green steel with a glint finish”.

The construction of the model was fairly simple. I constructed the horse and knight but didn’t glue them together as I was going to paint them separately. After the construction I decided to tackle the conversion of the sword into an axe. I started by cutting the top off the sword I then thinned the sword blade down so that it looked like an axe shaft. After creating the shaft with a craft knife I smoothed off the sharp corners with a file. After this I attached an axe head to the shaft with a combination of “green stuff” and glue.

As I’m new to the hobby this was my first experience of using “green stuff”. I found it a difficult medium to work with. It was either too tacky or too sloppy, when I used it with gel to stop it sticking. It was akin to using chewing gum to sculpt with. I’m sure I’ll get more confident in it’s use the more I use it but if anyone has any tips then please share!

Once the glue and “green stuff” mixture had dried I then primed the model by using chaos black spray paint followed by a touch up with Imperial Primer where needed.

Primed knight

I started off by undercoating all the cloth sections with Privateer Press’ Menoth White. I diluted the paint with a small amount of paint thinner, I applied three coats of Menoth White to the cloth sections.

Like most people knew to the hobby I still struggle with getting the thickness of my paints right. It’s either too thick or too runny, like a toddlers nose, all of which are nightmares when painting faces. I have found that paint thinner seems easier to use than water as the consistency is easier to judge and the paint stays wetter for longer.

I then moved on to painting the base of the horse flesh. I wanted the colour to look as natural as possible, which is difficult with green horse flesh. The horse flesh mixture was made from 2 parts Straken Green, 1 part Warpstone Glow, and one part paint thinner. The flesh received two base coats.The kight

I then went back to the cloth parts of the horse and the knight. I wanted the cloth to be a fresh radiant green to contrast the dark green of the horse flesh. I mixed a 50/50 mixture of Averland Sunset and Straken Green with a small amount of paint thinner. The cloth areas received three coats of paint. Once the paint was dry I applied two thin layers of Coelia Greenshade to the cloth.

With the left over cloth paint mixture I added a small amount of Cadian Fleshtone and painted the horse flesh highlights. I painted the shaded areas with a small amount Coelia Greenshade.Horse

For the knights armour and shield I wanted an olive green colour that also looked metallic. To achieve this I mixed two parts Coelia Greenshade to 1 part Leadbelcher with a small amount of paint thinner. The armour received two coats followed by a coat of Coelia Greenshade when it was dry.Shield

I then went on to paint the the golden areas of the knight. I wanted a warm gold colour so I started by first applying a coat of Screaming Bell to areas the areas I eventually wanted to paint gold. Once the screaming bell had dried I mixed 1 part Averland Sunset to 2 parts Gehenna’s Gold and painted over the golden areas. Once dried I coated the gold areas with a coat of Agrax Earthshade and then a dry brush of Golden Griffon. I then dry brushed the raised detail on the knights shield with Averland Sunset followed by a dry brush of Golden Griffon. After that is was just a matter of painting a few details, the saddle, axe shaft etc and the painting of the knight was done. Overall, I’m pretty happy with the end result. If you have any hints and tips please feel free to leave a comment.The Green Knight

Playing with Myself

I’m not really a television person. If there’s something I want to watch like a film or drama then I’ll record it and watch it at my leisure later. The thought of sitting down night after night being spoon-fed ‘entertainment’ in no way appeals to me, especially if it’s reality TV. If I do end up watching TV when I’m stressed then I tend to vent at the telly, which is not relaxing for me or anyone else in the room. For years I’ve distressed by gaming. I really enjoy the levels of interaction I get with PC games, planning a strategy, solving problems and increasingly interacting with others to accomplish joint goals gives me a level of immersion that I really enjoy.

Ringwraith

Recently, however, I haven’t gamed as regularly as I used to. This is for number of reasons; I have a young son and family, so now I only game when they are all sorted, when son in bed and my wife is busy doing things she wants to. I also work full time so my only gaming time is a couple of hours in the evening. My duties at work have also changed focus quite significantly. In the past my working week was split around 60% PC work 40% non-PC work, in the last few months this has changed to around 95% PC work and 5% non-PC work. This has effected how I want to spend my spare hours. Although I still love gaming on some nights I just can’t muster the motivation to turn on the PC when I’ve been sat in front of one all day.

So what can I do in these spare hours that I get in the evenings? Well drinking beer is obviously in there but what else? Several years ago I purchased what can best be described as a hoard of “The Lord of the Rings” Games Workshop miniatures. After painting a few goblins they got put away, when I went to University, and never saw the light of day again until recently when I excavated some models and paints from the attic. As I had most of the essentials at hand, unpainted miniatures, paints and brushes I decided that I might as well spend an evening painting some warriors of Rohan and Ringwraiths.image(1)

I can honestly say that I enjoyed myself. The end result wasn’t amazing but that, I hope, will come with time. What I really enjoyed was the process of painting, sitting quietly and having your whole mind concentrating on the task at hand. It was that absorbing that I didn’t have the opportunity to think about the stresses and worries of the day. It’s best described as a detox for the mind.

Now I’m not suggesting that everyone should run down to their local Game Workshop and buy a set of orcs, space marines, or miniature Boromir – in his death pose with arrows – as it might not be for them. What I am however, suggesting is that it’s good to do new, creative things, things that take concentration but not too much active thought, painting, sculpting, drawing, sewing or even jewellery making, it doesn’t matter what it is as long as it’s engaging, creative and new. The end product doesn’t have to be amazing as that’s not the point. It’s the process, the chance to dump all the stress out of your mind regularly that is the benefit. Plus you never know you might happen to get good at doing something ‘crafty’.