Citadel Project Box

Hobby space has always been an issue for me, mainly because I don’t have anywhere that I can permanently set up as a modelling area, this means I have boxes of paint and other bits in tubs and boxes secreted in random areas around the house. When it comes to painting I have to make do with a wooden board placed across my knee and a light at the side of me, it’s not ideal but it’s the best I can do. As space is an issue I’m always on the lookout for space saving hobby products so I’ve had my eye on the Citadel Project Box for while and last week, as part of my birthday haul, I received my very own Project Box.

  
I know the Project Box has been out for a while now but I thought that I’d write down my thoughts.

The Positives 

The Project Box looks great, the lid is embezzled with the Citadel demon head motif and the whole thing is well presented. When you open the box there’s plenty of storage for paint, tools and brushes but I’ll get onto that in a second. The Project Box has room to hold 49 Citadel paint pots in a tray. For a new hobbyist you’ll probably be able to fit all your paints into the box but for the more established painters this box will not store everything you have. Surprisingly, I’m happy with the paint storage space, it is a ‘project box’ and I can’t imagine needing more than 49 citadel paints for a project. That being said I do have more Citadel Paints and a number of other manufactures paints – Vallejo and Scale 75 – my Scale 75 are all stored in the aluminium tray but the Citadel and Vallejo are currently stored in a shoebox so I wanted to be able to store the shoe box paints in the Project Box. By using the areas designed for the mug and some of the other sections I managed to create enough room to store an additional 37 Citadel paints and 20 Vallejo paints.

  
The Project Box also had specific areas to store paintbrushes and other modelling tools, so far I’ve comfortably fitted eight brushes, six green stuff modelling brushes, a texture tool, four files, clippers, a mold line remover, a thumb drill, a craft knife and glue into these areas.

The Negatives

Overall, this feels like a quality product but the lid that doubles as your work area feels a little too thin. I wouldn’t want to put too much pressure on the lid which may be problematic if you’re using your craft knife. The other factor, at least for me, is that I wanted to use this on my lap, which you can do but it is a little uncomfortable. The plastic on the bottom of the box is thick with a number of right angles that start to dig into your thighs after a while. This can easily be solved with a thin cushion but it would have been better if GW had addressed this issue in the design.

The price is also a negative at ¬£42 direct from GW or around ¬£35 from an independent supplier it’s not a cheap piece of kit, especially, if you’re happy to have your gear in a few shoe boxes. 

Conclusion 

Despite the lid that feels a little too thin, the sore thighs and the price, I actually really like the ‘Project Box’ as it’s currently storing a lot of my gear. It’s probably because I’m storing so much paint in the box that it’s digging into my thighs. If I’m honest I’ll probably end up picking up a second box to use as a Project Box that just contains the things I need for a particular project I’m working on and not just a storage solution.

If you’re in a similar position to me and your hobby space is at minimum then I’d really recommend picking up a Project Box as I can’t think of a similar product on the market that is compact, looks cool and keeps all your bits togeather.