Having a clear out

This hobby goes hand in glove with hoarding, you can’t help it it just sneaks up on you. New models, new box sets and new paints either mean you’re left with a hoard of painted plastic or a pile of plastic still boxed on the spruce, what you get is dependant on your painting speed to purchase ratio – for me it’s plastic on the spruce.

The other week I took a look at my pile of shame and realised that I had a huge collection of Lord of the Rings miniatures from when I had my first hobby stint 16 years ago. They had to go, realistically, I was never going to paint them and they where just taking up room.

Next on the pile was the gene stealer models from the Space Hulk box that I’d acquired on my journeys, again they had to go, along with a Freebooter’s Fate jester, a random box of Empire Knights, some Heroquest models and a Games Day Chaos Warrior.

Recently, I’d been given two Dark Imperium sets and a First Strike box set. Now I love these sets but there’s only so many times I can paint the same model in the same pose so I cast a copy of Dark Imperium onto the warp that is eBay.

I then started to look at some of the painted models I’ve got sitting around. Now I’ve never attempted to sell any models I’ve painted before, in the main due to self doubt and having no idea of what to charge. Any way I thought I’d stick on a few models I’d bought simply to paint – Kaptin Badrukk and Grukk Face Rippa. I also had the intention, a few years ago, to start a Tomb Kings army. I’d purchased and painted up a Tomb Guard and Warsphinx and then the Tomb Kings got officially put to rest by GW. The TK I have have been sitting around for a while so they’ve also received the eBay treatment.

If I’m honest I’ve found having this clear out therapeutic as it’s allowed me to focus on the minis I currently want to paint instead of having a pile of models that are just sitting around taking up room and collecting more dust than my father in laws wallet. So if you’re in a hobby lull then I really recommend clearing out the model pile of shame so that you can focus on the models you really want to paint.

The clear out has reduced my 2018 painting is to the following:

– Death Guard Plague Marines (10)

– Poxwalker (28)

– Lord of Contagion (2)

– Tallman

– Drones (2)

– Standard Bearer

– Plaguecaster

– Morty

– Primaris Captain (2)

– Intercessors (10)

– Inceptors (6)

– Hellblasters (5)

– Ancient

I suspect this will now be an achievable painting goal for 2018 and if it isn’t there’s always eBay!

04 – Forever Autumn – Building a Base

DSC_0616-01 [127126]

Basing models is something I tend to rush. For me it’s normally the last step in the process and comes after I’ve completed the model which means I’m thinking about the next model and not the one I need to finish. With this in mind I decided that for my Emperor’s Children I’d make the bases in conjunction with the models.

The next decision was what type of base would match my pre-heresy Emperor’s Children, industrial, lava, snow, swamp or grass? In the end I went for a tiled derelict temple. I looked at resin bases but decided against this as I enjoy having a little money in my wallet. This led me to start trawling YouTube for do-it yourself basing videos. After watching a lot of dross I came across this video and decided that the method of creating a tiled floor looked easy, effective and a hell of a lot cheaper than resin bases.

The first step was to mark up 1cm x 1xcm squares on an old Warhammer box. After spending what seemed like an eternity cutting up a warsphinx box I eventually had enough tiles to begin gluing them to the base. For the tactical marine bases I decided to keep things simple so the tiles were glued directly to the base. For the larger terminator bases I added the hero of basing material cork. The cork added a physical depth and also distinguished the more costly models.


I then glued the tiles to the top of the cork in a fairly even tile pattern. Once the glue was dry I used a craft knife to trim the overhanging tiles. I then removed and lifted some of the tiles to add to the sense of age, decay and abandonment to the base. Once this was done I added some grit to the base area of the cork and random piles on the tiles to further add to the abandoned feel. The base was then primed black.


The next decision was around the colour scheme for the tiles. Originally I was thinking of making a dark green and black harlequin pattern but decided against this I thought it would probably end up being too dark. I then started to think about the overall theme of my Emperor’s Children, they’re still a loyalist legion but standing on the cusp of their fall into chaos. This led to me becoming a little poetic and thinking of my Emperor’s Children as being in the autumnal season of their service to the Emperor. To reflect this I thought I’d go with autumnal colours on the tiles so a deep red and yellow. To further reflect this I wanted to add some autumnal flocking to the base.

I then started to paint the full base using Scale 75 Walnut. The cork area was then dry brush highlighted with Scale 75 Tenere Yellow. For the tiles I went with Scale 75 Deep Red lightly mixed with the walnut and Scale 75 Tenere Yellow mixed with walnut and painted in an alternate pattern. These colours looked the most autumnal to me. After this a light drybrush of Scale 75 Rainy Grey over the tiles to pick out the tile edges.

The last element was to add some autumnal colour flocking to give the impression of fallen leaves.

I think the base complements the model nicely, what are your thoughts?


Creating a Wet Palette


The other day I decided to try my hand at creating a ‘wet palette’. Now for those of you who don’t know a wet palette is, it’s basically a magically simple tub that stops your paints from drying out once. It’s especially useful if you’ve created a unique colour and are halfway through a painting project as your paint will still be usable for days after the initial mixing.

Creating a wet palette is really simple and cheap so you don’t have an excuse for not using one.

Things you’ll need:

An air tight tupperware box that you can pick up from any supermarket or poundshop, please don’t use your child’s Transformers lunch box as it won’t be air tight and your child will crush your beloved plastic little men in a revenge attack.

A thick sponge that fits snuggly into the Tupperware box, it doesn’t have to be an exact fit but the closer to one the better.

Kitchen roll

Grease proof paper / baking paper



First put the sponge in the Tupperware box. After that place a double layer of kitchen roll on top of the sponge and then pour the water –out of the tap- over the kitchen roll. Fill the tub about half way with water; a thick sponge is needed so that you can store more water which means there’s more water to keep your palette wet. The wet kitchen roll holds a layer of water at the top of the sponge which will keep your paint wetter, if you don’t use the kitchen roll the wonderful force that is gravity will pool all your water at the bottom of the sponge and the top of sponge – where your paint is – will get dry. After this cut a sheet of baking paper to fit the top of the Tupperware box and place it over the now wet kitchen roll and gently push it into place.

Congratulations, you’ve now made a wet palette. It was simple I know. Use the baking paper to mix your paint on (use paint thinner) and once you’ve finished put the lid on the Tupperware box to ensure it is air tight. An air tight box will keep your paint out of the pot fresh for days. If you want to prolong the life of the paint on the wet palette you can place the whole tub in the fridge but I won’t be responsible for any beatings you receive off your significant other!


Chaos Lord

Chaos Lord

One horny bastard

I’ve been working on my Chaos Lord for just over a month now, it’s in no way a difficult model to paint I’m just a really slow painter! I wanted the Chaos Lord to fit thematically with my Seekers of Slaanesh regiment but I didn’t want him to look exactly the same – he’s a Lord after all. I decided to stick with the purple and gold as the main colours but then mix and match everything else to add a little variety.

For the Warriors the purple came in with the capes and banner and the gold was the embossing on the shields. For the Chaos Lord I went for purple armour and flesh with gold embossing on the armour. I haven’t set the Warriors and the Lord out together yet but I’m sure that colour wise they’ll look as co-coordinated as superhero themed stag party.

So for those who would like to know how I painted my Chaos Lord then carry on reading.

I like to build up the major sections of the model first, paint them and then glue them together at the end. I paint for pleasure and am not concerned with how long a model takes to paint. I also thin all my paints before using them with the exception of the metallic colours as I can’t seem them to thin them down and keep their consistency.

After removing the model from the spruce and tidying the model up I primed it with Chaos Black GW spray paint. Is the spray paint still called that or is it Abaddon Black now?

I then painted the cape in Caliban Green* and washed it in Drakenhof Nightshade. Once the wash was dry I dry brushed the cape with a Caliban Green and Warpstone Glow mixture. I started off with just a hint of Warptone in the mix and thicker dry brushing to more Warpstone but just a hint of it on the brush. You will just want to be able to see it on your hand before applying it to the model.

*I’ll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
for the liquor is not earthly.

Once the cape was painted I moved onto the scabbard and coin purse which I painted Guilliam Blue and then dry brushed the edge lightly with a lighter blue.

For the spear blade I used Warplock Bronze and then glazed with Lamenters Yellow. After that I dry brushed the edges with Runefang Steel.

After this I started on the armour. The base was painted with Xerus Purple and then washed in Druchii Violet. Once dry I dry brushed with Daemonette Hide for the highlights. For the gold trim I used an undercoat of Screaming Bell, followed by Balthsar Gold and then highlighted with Golden Griffon. Surprisingly, there was no dry brushing taking place for the gold sections.

The bone areas were painted with an undercoat of Privateer Press Menoth White followed by Agrax Earthshade Wash and the dry brushed with Tyrant Skull*. I wanted to make the shoulder guard look like an actual skull instead of a forged part of the armour so I painted that in the same way. When I glued the front and back of the model together the joint wasn’t flush so I painted over the gap with liquid green stuff – which is potted magic – and then painted as normal.

*otherwise know as the mother-in-law

For the flesh I undercoated with Daemonette Hide, I then added some Cadian Fleshtone to the Daemonette Hide and painted the highlights.

Lastly the base was painted with a base of Mechanicus Standard Grey and they dry brushed (but using a normal brush) with Celestra Grey. As the base is compact and busy with a number of skulls and rocks I decided not to flock it.

And that was that, complete, done and dusted. My next project will be some Chaos Knights! Blood for the Blood God!

I got all my bits from Element Games (twitter: ), they’re around 15-20% cheaper than buying direct from Gamesworkshop. If you do order from Element Games then use code STE978 as you’ll get double store credit and I’ll get a little too!

Everyone’s a winner… except for the losers of course!

The Seekers of Slaanesh

The Seekers of Slaanesh
Last week I completed my first regiment of Chaos Warriors, the twelve warriors and their bases took me around two months to complete. For those of you who follow me on twitter you’ll have noticed that my feed has been saturated with pictures of Chaos Warriors slowly being assembled and built. For those who follow me for my wit, manly good looks and charm their fingers must have hovered over the unfollowbutton like a fat man’s finger lurks over the microwave start button.

When I was searching for inspiration for my colour scheme it became apparent that most people tended to paint their Chaos Warriors in

Would you like to blow my boney horn?

Would you like to blow my boney horn?

either a black, red or green colour scheme. I wanted something a little different and as purple is my favourite colour I decided to use that as the central colour to build my scheme around. To stick with the lore I decided to make them followers of Slaanesh as purple is also his colour. I also wanted the regiment to look clean. A lot of the pictures I’d seen made the warriors look dirty and Ill kept. I went for a clean look as the Warriors of Chaos are pure fighters, it’s all they do. If my life was dependant on, and focused around, deeds of arms then I’d make sure my equipment was clean and well maintained. I also imagined that any follower of Slannesh would be as vain as Narcissus and thus spend a lot of time on their personal appearance.
As I’d made the cape purple I decided to paint the fur area white and then wash it in Agrax Earthshade to add a little shade and depth. For the armour I wanted a blue metallic appearance. I created the colour by building up and mixing several different metal, blue colours and washes – I’ll give the details at the end. The colour would also make a good base colour for a Tzeentch themed army.

I chose gold for the armour and shield trim to maintain the clean look. I painted the shield and halberd in pure metallic colours and then washed them in a 50/50 purple wash and paint thinner mix.
For the bases I used some thin torn cork to add a little texture, painted then with the grey texture paint, added some rocks which I painted a lighter grey. I then dry brushed the cork with the lighter grey and then washed the whole base in either Agrax Earthshade or Nulin Oil. I then added a few clumps of grass, in many ways like Alan Titchmarsh.


I’ve dubbed the regiment “The Seekers of Slaanesh” (I painted a Slaanesh symbol on the banner and added a ‘N’ at the top like a compass, clever I know). I’m happy with the colour scheme and the way the bones and skulls have turned out, but there were still times when I struggled with the thickness of the paint and the painting of details with a thin brush – stopping the brush drying versus overloading it with paint. Overall, especially with this only being my second real project and my first every completed regiment, I’m happy with the end results.
My next model will be a Lord of Chaos that surprisingly has the same look on his face as I do when I’m having a poo.

If anyone has any tips or suggestions on where I can improve then please comment on the blog as all comments are greatly appreciated.


Cook Book


The Green Knight

Over the last few months I’ve been steadily honing my painting skills by watching youtube videos, reading forums and other hobbyists tweets and of course practicing. I’ve definitely noticed a big improvement when I compare my first first Rohan Warrior – which I painted back in November – and my biggest project to date – The Green Knight. Overall, I’ve found the whole process, from assembling to painting, a lot of fun but it has been a steep learning curve and I’ve made a lot of school boy errors along the way.

So in this blog I will cover how I made the Green Knight. This blog in no way is intended to be a definitive guide on “how to paint The Green Knight” as quite frankly I’m nowhere near the standard of painter that can lecture others on how to paint. I want this post to be a “how I bumbled my way through my first project” guide.

So why did I chose The Green Knight as my first project? I suppose the biggest reason is that I love knights, medieval knights, fantasy novels, RPGs, magic wizards and swords. I also really love the Arthurian tale of “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight”. So when I first saw the Green Knight miniature I knew it was the miniature for me, In short he looked epic.

There was however, three things that niggled my about the miniature which I knew I had to change. The first was that he was carrying a sword. The Green Knight does not carry a sword he carries “the mother of all axes“. This meant that I would have to carry out my first conversion if I wanted the Green Knight to look as I wanted him to. The second issue was the standard that attaches itself to the Green Knights back. I hated it, it just seemed a little too oriental for how I envisaged my knight, it had to go. Finally, the third issue was the armour and horse colour, everything had to be green as that’s how the Green Knight is described in the tale and not how Games Workshop had painted him in their promotional material.

“No soul had ever seen

a knight of such a kind –

entirely emerald green.


and in the other hand held the

mother of all axes,

a cruel piece of kit I kid you not:

the head was an ell in length at least

and forged in green steel with a glint finish”.

The construction of the model was fairly simple. I constructed the horse and knight but didn’t glue them together as I was going to paint them separately. After the construction I decided to tackle the conversion of the sword into an axe. I started by cutting the top off the sword I then thinned the sword blade down so that it looked like an axe shaft. After creating the shaft with a craft knife I smoothed off the sharp corners with a file. After this I attached an axe head to the shaft with a combination of “green stuff” and glue.

As I’m new to the hobby this was my first experience of using “green stuff”. I found it a difficult medium to work with. It was either too tacky or too sloppy, when I used it with gel to stop it sticking. It was akin to using chewing gum to sculpt with. I’m sure I’ll get more confident in it’s use the more I use it but if anyone has any tips then please share!

Once the glue and “green stuff” mixture had dried I then primed the model by using chaos black spray paint followed by a touch up with Imperial Primer where needed.

Primed knight

I started off by undercoating all the cloth sections with Privateer Press’ Menoth White. I diluted the paint with a small amount of paint thinner, I applied three coats of Menoth White to the cloth sections.

Like most people knew to the hobby I still struggle with getting the thickness of my paints right. It’s either too thick or too runny, like a toddlers nose, all of which are nightmares when painting faces. I have found that paint thinner seems easier to use than water as the consistency is easier to judge and the paint stays wetter for longer.

I then moved on to painting the base of the horse flesh. I wanted the colour to look as natural as possible, which is difficult with green horse flesh. The horse flesh mixture was made from 2 parts Straken Green, 1 part Warpstone Glow, and one part paint thinner. The flesh received two base coats.The kight

I then went back to the cloth parts of the horse and the knight. I wanted the cloth to be a fresh radiant green to contrast the dark green of the horse flesh. I mixed a 50/50 mixture of Averland Sunset and Straken Green with a small amount of paint thinner. The cloth areas received three coats of paint. Once the paint was dry I applied two thin layers of Coelia Greenshade to the cloth.

With the left over cloth paint mixture I added a small amount of Cadian Fleshtone and painted the horse flesh highlights. I painted the shaded areas with a small amount Coelia Greenshade.Horse

For the knights armour and shield I wanted an olive green colour that also looked metallic. To achieve this I mixed two parts Coelia Greenshade to 1 part Leadbelcher with a small amount of paint thinner. The armour received two coats followed by a coat of Coelia Greenshade when it was dry.Shield

I then went on to paint the the golden areas of the knight. I wanted a warm gold colour so I started by first applying a coat of Screaming Bell to areas the areas I eventually wanted to paint gold. Once the screaming bell had dried I mixed 1 part Averland Sunset to 2 parts Gehenna’s Gold and painted over the golden areas. Once dried I coated the gold areas with a coat of Agrax Earthshade and then a dry brush of Golden Griffon. I then dry brushed the raised detail on the knights shield with Averland Sunset followed by a dry brush of Golden Griffon. After that is was just a matter of painting a few details, the saddle, axe shaft etc and the painting of the knight was done. Overall, I’m pretty happy with the end result. If you have any hints and tips please feel free to leave a comment.The Green Knight