Having a clear out

This hobby goes hand in glove with hoarding, you can’t help it it just sneaks up on you. New models, new box sets and new paints either mean you’re left with a hoard of painted plastic or a pile of plastic still boxed on the spruce, what you get is dependant on your painting speed to purchase ratio – for me it’s plastic on the spruce.

The other week I took a look at my pile of shame and realised that I had a huge collection of Lord of the Rings miniatures from when I had my first hobby stint 16 years ago. They had to go, realistically, I was never going to paint them and they where just taking up room.

Next on the pile was the gene stealer models from the Space Hulk box that I’d acquired on my journeys, again they had to go, along with a Freebooter’s Fate jester, a random box of Empire Knights, some Heroquest models and a Games Day Chaos Warrior.

Recently, I’d been given two Dark Imperium sets and a First Strike box set. Now I love these sets but there’s only so many times I can paint the same model in the same pose so I cast a copy of Dark Imperium onto the warp that is eBay.

I then started to look at some of the painted models I’ve got sitting around. Now I’ve never attempted to sell any models I’ve painted before, in the main due to self doubt and having no idea of what to charge. Any way I thought I’d stick on a few models I’d bought simply to paint – Kaptin Badrukk and Grukk Face Rippa. I also had the intention, a few years ago, to start a Tomb Kings army. I’d purchased and painted up a Tomb Guard and Warsphinx and then the Tomb Kings got officially put to rest by GW. The TK I have have been sitting around for a while so they’ve also received the eBay treatment.

If I’m honest I’ve found having this clear out therapeutic as it’s allowed me to focus on the minis I currently want to paint instead of having a pile of models that are just sitting around taking up room and collecting more dust than my father in laws wallet. So if you’re in a hobby lull then I really recommend clearing out the model pile of shame so that you can focus on the models you really want to paint.

The clear out has reduced my 2018 painting is to the following:

– Death Guard Plague Marines (10)

– Poxwalker (28)

– Lord of Contagion (2)

– Tallman

– Drones (2)

– Standard Bearer

– Plaguecaster

– Morty

– Primaris Captain (2)

– Intercessors (10)

– Inceptors (6)

– Hellblasters (5)

– Ancient

I suspect this will now be an achievable painting goal for 2018 and if it isn’t there’s always eBay!

Nurgle’s Rot

I’m a bit of a sucker for picking up a random paint pot when I enter a GW store, on most occasions I don’t even need that particular paint but I’ve found buying my paints this way reduces the financial pain when I get a new model as I’ll have most of the colours I need.

I picked up a Nurgle’s Rot technical paint using the method above and left it sitting with my other paints, unopened and unloved, until recently that is. As I’ve now started painting up my Death Guard – who are big fans of Nurgle – I’ve found that I’ve been using Nurgles Rot on every model as it adds a nice slimey, puss filled look to all the boils and open wounds the model may have and if you’re favoured by Nurgle that’s a lot of boils.

For my Death Guard models I’ve been using Nurgle’s Rot sparingly as I wanted it look like the layer area between the marine and his armour is full of rot and puss with this being seen as it seeps from the holes in the armour. I wanted this to look subtle and not detract from the rest of the work I’d put into the model.

I used Nurgle’s Rot again on my pox-walker to add a little gooey, wet look to boils and sores on the body. Again I only added a little to the model.

All in all I’ve found Nurgle’s Rot to be a great technical paint for adding a diseased look to your model. I suspect that it’s best to use this in moderation otherwise the model may end up looking like a wet mess!

2017: A Retrospective

I’ve just looked at the site and I’ve posted exactly one blog this year which I’ll admit isn’t exactly record breaking. I’ve been busy outside of my hobbies with work, moving house and life in general throwing some unexpected swerve balls that diminished any insensitive I’ve had to write. Hopefully, 2018 will be better and I’ll get my writing mojo back.

Although I haven’t blogged in any meaningful way this year I have managed to paint a few models up which I thought I’d share some examples of in this post.

The start of the year was taken up with painting the Silvertower models.

After painting up my Silvertower models I delved into the universe of 40k and paint up some Ultramarines. I’d picked up some Primaris Marines on eBay for a couple of pounds and thought I’d paint them up as smurfs as all the GW box art features them and I’ve never painted any.

Next on the list was to finish off a Carmine Dragon that I’ve had knocking around for a few years. There wasn’t a lot to do on this except for the horn work and the base.

At this point in the year I picked up two Dark Imperium and a Know No Fear box sets which has meant that for the latter part of the year I’ve been alternating between painting the Astartes up as Imperial Fist and painting the Death Guard.

My plans for 2018 are to keep working away on the Imperial Fists and Death Guard and resist the urge to deviate into other armies. Hopefully, this will happen and I’ll also be able to write more than one blog in 2018!

Games Workshop and Social Media

Last December it was a landmark birthday for my wife. So in the hope of easing the pain I booked a secret family break to stay in an old hunting lodge – that looked very much like a castle from the old world – near Carlisle. On the way we decided to stop off at Kendal and have a look around and like most people who paint plastic miniatures we (myself, wifey and the tiny man) ended up in Kendal’s Games Workshop store.

I have to admit that ending up in the store didn’t happen totally by mistake as I really wanted to meet the man who was behind the stores Twitter and Instagram account. GW at the moment are in the middle of a social media awakening with the creation of Warhammer TV, the community site and the use of platforms like Instagram. Even the staff at Warhammer world have their own personal Twitter accounts and are engaging with the community. If I’m honest this level of engagement is excellent and as a member of the community the impression I get is that GW it’s filled with passionate people that love their job and their hobby.

However, there is a problem and that’s the social media engagement from the local stores which, if I’m honest, is pretty poor. It feels like the memo was only received by the staff at Warhammer World that they can use a social media platform, other than Facebook, to promote the hobby, their store and engage with the wider community.

This has led to a situation where the local stores are languishing in the chaos realms of Facebook only using Twitter to push their Facebook posts to, which isn’t engagement, it’s just annoying. Now this may be just me being over sensitive to the issue as I don’t use Facebook but as the hobby is very visual I don’t understand why Twitter and Instagram aren’t used as both platforms have a massive community that would willingly engage. I can understand the argument that a lot of GW stores struggle for time but engaging with a new generation on the platforms that they use would surely be more beneficial in the long term for both the store and the hobby as whole.

Social media certainly brought me back into the hobby, after a long hiatus I discovered the #warmongers community along with some stunning model pictures which meant I popped into a GW store and picked up a few paints and a model, several years later I’m still painting and buying! I probably never would have gotten back into the hobby without the online community and I certainly wouldn’t have improved as a painter without ther guidance. So if social media can bring back an old warhorse like me then I’m sure it can entice a new generation that are on several social media platforms into this creative and fun hobby.

In closing and getting back to my visit to GW Kendal I met Adam the store manager and I have to say he gets it. He engages directly with the community through, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, he posts pictures of the models the guys who visit his store paint, he retweets tweets from other community members – many I assume who have never been to his store – and he engages and responds to comments, in short he promotes the hobby and his store. Because of his presence and use of Twitter and Instagram I visited his store as I was passing through the town, purchased a copy of White Dwarf and we had a chat. I will never be a regular visitor to Kendal but I can guarantee that the next time I’m there I’ll pop in, say ‘hello’ and buy something.

So GW stores I don’t expect the level of engagement that is coming from Warhammer World but it would be nice if the hobby at the local store level was engaging with the online community. It can be done as Adam at GW Kendal has shown, treat him as your primarch and mould your chapters in his image.

I’d be interested to hear what the community thinks. Are there any GW Stores that use a few social media platforms to promote their store and hobby. If there is please mention them in the comments below.

05 – Terminator Captain

I have to admit I approached this model with a little trepidation as the captain wasn’t wearing his helmet, which meant i’d have to paint some flesh. I’ve always shied away painting flesh as there tends to be no middle ground in that it either looks good or crap.

So with this in mind I cracked open the various flesh shades contained in the Scale 75 Scalecolour range, Pink Flesh, Basic Flesh, Golden Skin, Light Skin, Pale Skin, along with Citadel’s Lahmian Medium and Reikland Fleshshade.


I started with a base layer covering of thinned Pink Flesh. It took a few coats to get the colour uniform.After that it was just a case of building the highlights up but instead of thinning the paint with thinner I used the Lahmian Medium as I’ve found this is great for blending. After I’d added the first highlight of Basic Flesh I used a thinned wash of Reikland Earthshade just to pull the blends together. I then highlighted further with Golden Skin, Light Skin and a final highlight on Pale Skin. In between these layers I added every increasing thinned layers of Reikland where needed.


After the flesh was painted I thought I’d try my hand at adding some details. Firstly with a really light purple mixed with a little Pale Flesh I started to pick out the veins in the head. It took my ages to do this but sadly I couldn’t get the camera to to pick them out.

After this I started on the facial and head stubble. This was done by mixing a light grey with some pale skin and applying it to the correct areas. Applying several coats made the hair look thicker. Once the hair was dry I applied a super thin wash of pale skin mixed with Lahmian to pull the colours together.


The only other thing of real note that I did differently on this model was to add some Emperor’s Children transfers to the cape as I wanted the cape to show the prestige of the Captain. The transfers were added using Micro Set and Micro Sol which is a must purchase if you’re adding transfers (I have a blog on Micro Sol and Micro Set in the pipeline). Once the transfer where set I added a layer of anti-shine, see here.



I’ll add some piccies later once I’ve finished the base!

paintRack – the Greatest Painting App around


Like most hobbyist I’ve amassed a small* collection of paints in every hue imaginable in order to paint my battle hardened plastic warriors.

*read large collection, however, if anyone asks I will never have enough paints.

I own paints designed to be used with a brush, with an airbrush, to be dry brushed on, and to be washed on and they’re all from several different paint manufacturers; Citadel, P3, Vallejo, Scale75 and Army Painter (this doesn’t even cover the oil paints and pigments).

What I’ve found, however, is that I get colour blind with all the choice so I end up painting with my favorite paints at the moment, which is currently Scale75, and ignore the rest.This both limits my pallet and is a waste of the paint I own but haven’t considered as it wasn’t immediately at hand.

So the other night on twitter I asked the question to the #warmongers community

I recieve two responses to this question with both recommending paintRack

After downloading paintRack by @courageousocto and using it for a few days I can honestly say it’s excellent. The app allows you list paints from the Citadel, P3, Reaper, Vallejo, Warpaints, Tamiya, Scale75, Coat d’Arms, Citadel Classic, Minitaire, Watercolours, Humbrol, Andrea Colour, Ammo and Secret Weapon. You can add the paints by a simple click or just scan the barcode.

They’re two features however, that really make this app stand out for me. The first, is the library feature that lets you organise your paints, irrespective of brand, in colour order. I’ve found this really useful when picking out shades of paint for new schemes. The second features I really like is the ‘sets’ feature that allows you to store the colours you’ve used for specific models and their different elements, there’s even an area to add your mixing ratio notes. This for me is a great as I normally write my colour scheme down and then I lose the book a few days later.

So if you want an app that will list, organise, create sets, have a wish list and colour tools for your paints then this app is definitely worth looking at. I believe there’s a trial version but I immediately forked out for the full version at £2.79 after using it for a few minutes as I was really impressed. If you’re still not convinced then you can watch the promo video below.


And the link to the app on the Android Play store is here. Unfortunately, I don’t think it is available for the i-People.


During the continuing course of painting my Emperor’s Children I’ve started to use a lot more transfers. In the past I’ve had a love/hate relationship with transfers. On one hand they add a level of crisp detail that I don’t have the ability to match with a brush but on the other hand they always have a slight shine to them making them look as false as politician who is asked to carry out a normal activity in front of the press (for examples see the pictorial evidence below).

To try and remove the shine of the transfer I thought I’d try the Anti-Shine Matt Varnish by Army Painter. To apply the varnish I brushed it on like I would with paint. I applied a few layers over the transfer and the shine, at least to my eyes, was reduced. The Anti-Shine doesn’t seem to have affected the colour of the paint either which would have been a massive disappointment if it had.

In short along with the micro-set and micro-sol the Army Painter Anti-Shine will become a mainstay in my transfer arsenal. Buy some and use it for all your anti-shine needs.